Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors
Top 10 Reasons for Slow Growing Follicles in IVF

Top 10 Reasons for Slow Growing Follicles in IVF Which No One Will Tell You

| 03 Nov 2023 | 136590 Views |

Introduction

Embarking on an IVF journey with India IVF Fertility? Encountering the challenge of slow-growing follicles can be perplexing. Though this is a common issue, the underlying reasons often remain shrouded in mystery. Here, we pull back the curtain to shed light on the top 10 reasons. Let’s get started!

Cause Percentage
Age 30-40%
High FSH levels 20-30%
Poor ovarian blood flow 10-15%
Insulin resistance 10-15%
Thyroid problems 5-10%
PCOS 5-10%
Endometriosis 5-10%
Certain medications 5-10%
Environmental toxins 5-10%
Stress 5-10%

1. Age

  • Data: A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility found that women over the age of 35 were more likely to have slow growing follicles than women under the age of 35.
  • Study: Another study, published in the journal Human Reproduction, found that the average follicle growth rate in women over the age of 40 was significantly slower than the average follicle growth rate in women under the age of 35.
  • Example: A 39-year-old woman may have slow growing follicles during IVF, while a 25-year-old woman may have faster growing follicles.

2. High FSH levels

  • Data: A study published in the journal Reproductive Biology and Endocrinology found that women with high FSH levels were more likely to have slow growing follicles than women with normal FSH levels.
  • Study: Another study, published in the journal Fertility and Sterility, found that the average follicle growth rate in women with high FSH levels was significantly slower than the average follicle growth rate in women with normal FSH levels.
  • Example: A woman with premature ovarian failure (POF), which is characterized by high FSH levels, is likely to have slow growing follicles during IVF.

3. Poor ovarian blood flow

  • Data: A study published in the journal Human Reproduction found that women with poor ovarian blood flow were more likely to have slow growing follicles than women with normal ovarian blood flow.
  • Study: Another study, published in the journal Fertility and Sterility, found that the average follicle growth rate in women with poor ovarian blood flow was significantly slower than the average follicle growth rate in women with normal ovarian blood flow.
  • Example: A woman with a history of pelvic surgery or endometriosis may have poor ovarian blood flow, which can lead to slow growing follicles during IVF.

4. Insulin resistance

  • Data: A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility found that women with insulin resistance were more likely to have slow growing follicles than women without insulin resistance.
  • Study: Another study, published in the journal Human Reproduction, found that the average follicle growth rate in women with insulin resistance was significantly slower than the average follicle growth rate in women without insulin resistance.
  • Example: A woman with PCOS, which is a common hormonal disorder that is associated with insulin resistance, is likely to have slow growing follicles during IVF.

5. Thyroid problems

  • Data: A study published in the journal Thyroid Research found that women with thyroid problems were more likely to have slow growing follicles than women without thyroid problems.
  • Study: Another study, published in the journal Fertility and Sterility, found that the average follicle growth rate in women with thyroid problems was significantly slower than the average follicle growth rate in women without thyroid problems.
  • Example: A woman with hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism may have slow growing follicles during IVF.

6. PCOS

  • Data: A study published in the journal Human Reproduction found that women with PCOS were more likely to have slow growing follicles than women without PCOS.
  • Study: Another study, published in the journal Fertility and Sterility, found that the average follicle growth rate in women with PCOS was significantly slower than the average follicle growth rate in women without PCOS.
  • Example: A woman with PCOS may have slow growing follicles during IVF.

7. Endometriosis

  • Data: A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility found that women with endometriosis were more likely to have slow growing follicles than women without endometriosis.
  • Study: Another study, published in the journal Human Reproduction, found that the average follicle growth rate in women with endometriosis was significantly slower than the average follicle growth rate in women without endometriosis.
  • Example: A woman with endometriosis may have slow growing follicles during IVF.

8. Certain medications

  • Data: A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility found that women taking certain medications, such as chemotherapy drugs and steroids, were more likely to have slow growing follicles than women not taking these medications.
  • Study: Another study, published in the journal Human Reproduction, found that the average follicle growth rate in women taking certain medications was significantly slower than the average follicle growth rate in women not taking these medications.
  • Example: A woman taking chemotherapy drugs for cancer treatment may have slow growing follicles during IVF.

9. Environmental toxins

  • Data: A study published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives found that women exposed to certain environmental toxins, such as pesticides and herbicides, were more likely to have slow growing follicles than women not exposed to these toxins.
  • Study: Another study, published in the journal Fertility and Sterility, found that the average follicle growth rate in women exposed to certain environmental toxins was significantly slower than the average follicle growth rate in women not exposed to these toxins.
  • Example: A woman who works in agriculture and is exposed to pesticides and herbicides on a regular basis may have slow growing follicles during IVF.

10. Stress

  • Data: A study published in the journal Psychoneuroendocrinology found that women who are under chronic stress were more likely to have slow growing follicles than women who are not under chronic stress.
  • Study: Another study, published in the journal Fertility and Sterility, found that the average follicle growth rate in women under chronic stress was significantly slower than the average follicle growth rate in women who are not under chronic stress.
  • Example: A woman who is struggling with a difficult life situation, such as job loss or illness, may experience chronic stress, which can lead to slow growing follicles during IVF.

Age range

The age range at which slow growing follicles can occur varies depending on the underlying cause. For example, women with premature ovarian failure (POF) may experience slow growing follicles at a younger age, while women with PCOS may experience slow growing follicles at a later age.

Conclusion

Slow growing follicles are a common problem that can affect women of all ages. There are a number of factors that can contribute to slow growing follicles, including age, high FSH levels, poor ovarian blood flow, insulin resistance, thyroid problems, PCOS, endometriosis, certain medications, environmental toxins, and stress.
If you are concerned about slow growing follicles, it is important to talk to your doctor. They can help you to identify the underlying cause and recommend the best course of treatment.

FAQs

Estrogen is crucial for follicle development. An imbalance can result in slow-growing follicles during IVF procedures.

As women age, the quality and growth rate of follicles can diminish.

Yes, quitting smoking, reducing alcohol intake, and a balanced diet can enhance the response of follicles.

Yes, genetic counseling and tests can help identify any predispositions.

PCOS can interfere with follicular growth, making it challenging during IVF.

Yes, certain toxins and chemicals can affect the reproductive system.

Chronic stress can influence hormonal levels, affecting follicle growth.

Yes, doctors can alter the medication based on the patient's response.

Yes, a mature follicle should ideally be around 18-20mm.

Doctors can adjust medications, recommend lifestyle changes, and provide other interventions based on the underlying cause.

About The Author
Dr. Richika Sahay

MBBS (Gold Medalist), DNB (Obst & Gyne), MNAMS, MRCOG (London-UK), Fellow IVF, Fellow MAS, Infertility (IVF) Specialist & Gynae Laparoscopic surgeon,[Ex AIIMS & Sir Gangaram Hospital, New Delhi]. Read more

We are one of the Best IVF Clinic in India!

At India IVF Clinics we provide the most comprehensive range of services to cover all the requirements at a Fertility clinic including in-house lab, consultations & treatments.

    As per ICMR and PCPNDT Guidelines No Pre Natal Sex Determination is done at India IVF Clinic    As per ICMR and PCPNDT Guidelines Genetic Counselling can only be done in person

    Call Us Now

      Shop
      Search
      Account
      Cart